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Reporter Katy Tur Shares Her ‘Front-Row’ View Of The Trump Campaign

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uring Donald Trump’s campaign for president, there were times at his rallies when he singled out one reporter for criticism. Katy Tur, who covered the Trump campaign for NBC News and MSNBC, remembers those instances vividly.

Tur was working at a rally on Dec. 7, 2015, in Mount Pleasant, S.C., when suddenly Trump called her name and pointed at her from the podium: “‘Katy Tur, she’s back there. Little Katy … what a lie it was … what a lie she told,'” she recalls him saying.

Then, Tur says, “The entire place turns and they roar as one … like a giant, unchained animal.” Men stood on chairs to yell at her, and she began to fear for her safety. She smiled and waved in an effort to defuse the situation. Later, the Secret Service escorted her to her car.

As the first network news reporter assigned to the Trump campaign full time, Tur became accustomed to jeers and threats from Trump supporters. Now she’s written a memoir about her experiences on the campaign trail, called Unbelievable: My Front-Row Seat to the Craziest Campaign in American History.

I just remember thinking, Smile and wave. Because if you smile at them and you wave, I had learned up to this point, then you diminish the tension, you diffuse the situation, you mitigate it. Because if you look intimidated, if you look scared, people will take advantage, and people will push hard. … I had felt uneasy before then, here and there, but that day I thought, This is taking it too far.

On Donald Trump calling her “Little Katy”

I’m 5’2″, 5’3″ on a good day. … Marco Rubio [who Trump calls “Little Marco”] is quite tall. I am much shorter than Marco Rubio. I think he means it not only in a physically demeaning way but as an intimidation tactic: You’re little, you’re young and you’re inexperienced and you can be pushed around. You’re not a political heavyweight. You’re not one of the big guns. I presume that’s sort of how he means it, but he’s also a very literal guy. When he sees someone who is little, and I am little, I think he is apt to say just that, that person is a little person.

This was New Hampshire, and it was early on in the campaign, I think it was Nov. 11, 2015. It was right after the Milwaukee Republican debate, and I am there in New Hampshire, I had just done a hit on Morning Joe, and the question that Mika Brzezinski asked me was about why Donald Trump was changing his tone, because he was nicer in that debate that he had been in the past. …

And so I was talking about his tone and I guess I came off as relatively generous toward Donald Trump, compared to my previous reporting, because Donald Trump walks in, and the barrels in and the first thing he sees is me standing off to the side, and he comes right up to me, and he kisses me on the cheek. Just puts his hands on my shoulders and pulls me in. …

I was powerless. I just stood there frozen thinking, Oh my god, what is this man doing? He’s not my friend. He’s not my business partner. He’s not my social acquaintance. He’s not a family member of mine. This is somebody I am covering. This is a presidential candidate, I am the reporter assigned on this beat — it just crosses a huge line. It’s so unprofessional and so inappropriate given the circumstances.

I remember being horrified that a camera caught it and that my bosses back in New York would see it, and they would think that I was not a serious reporter and that I was too close to the campaign and I couldn’t report accurately or fairly about him or that viewers might think that. I panicked. I went and I found one of our senior producers for Morning Joe and I asked, “Did you catch that on camera?” And he said, “No, we didn’t.” And I remember breathing a sigh of relief and then hearing Donald Trump brag about it on the air with Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski.

On how Trump made fun of her for stumbling on a question during her interview with him on NBC News

I knew that he was going to try and intimidate me. I knew he was going to try and steamroll me. And so when he said, “You’re stumbling,” I remember smiling and laughing a little in my head and saying, Of course he’s doing this. But also saying, He is trying to intimidate you, so take a deep breath. …

[The interview] put me onto the political scene in a significant way. It was a really contentious and tense interview. I didn’t realize how angry he was in the moment while I was interviewing him. I presumed it was all a part of his shtick, it was all part of this show that he has. He’s a reality TV show host, he’s known for the catchphrase, “You’re fired.” He’s known for getting in people’s faces, so I just thought this was him being TV’s Donald Trump.

When I watched it on the air, alongside Chuck Todd [NBC’s political director and moderator of Meet the Press] … I couldn’t believe how angry [Trump] actually was. He was seething. He never smiled. He was glaring at me the whole time. It was very clear that he had anticipated a much easier interview.

On her parents, who created the Los Angeles News Service, specializing in helicopter footage

They found O.J. [Simpson] on the slow-speed pursuit. They covered the 1992 L.A. riots and the beating, infamously, of Reginald Denny, a gravel truck driver who happened to stop at the wrong intersection at the wrong time. They covered almost every police pursuit that you saw in Los Angeles in the 1990s, Malibu wildfires, Madonna and Sean Penn getting married — Madonna ended up flipping my dad the bird — and in one instance a terrible crash at LAX where two planes collided on the tarmac and burst into flames. …

My mom would hang out over the skids of the helicopter, just strapped in with a harness with a 50-, 70-pound something like that beta-cam on her shoulder recording the news 100 feet, 200 feet, 500 feet below her. …

My parents covered police pursuits and it was in many ways the beginnings of reality show TV in this captivating story that was a lot of flashes, but not all that much substance. So when they popularized it and made it must-see television in the 90s, you couldn’t tear yourself away from a police pursuit, there was cheeky talk, which obviously had a grain of truth to it, that they were responsible for diminishing the seriousness of the nightly broadcast of news. I have mixed feelings about it now because they covered a lot of really serious stories.

Sam Briger and Mooj Zadie produced and edited the audio of this interview. Bridget Bentz, Molly Seavy-Nesper and Martina Stewart adapted it for the Web.

Source: NPR

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‘The Square’ Interview with Ruben Östlund, Claes Bang and Elisabeth Moss

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Director Ruben Östlund is an adventurer of Swedish film and a hard man to satiate. It is seen in his Oscar-nominated film – The Square that has received much attention. Here is an excerpt from the interview with The Playlist as actors Claes Bang and Elisabeth Moss share their experience with the movie and the director.

Claes Bang: Can I tell you a funny story from Cannes?

Elisabeth Moss: Yeah.

Claes Bang: When we were [at Cannes] there was this Screen International journalist, Wendy Mitchell, and she saw the film, she loved it, and she started [rooting] for me as best actor. She put on her Facebook page she put “The Daily Bang” and posted a new photo of me every day. Invented the hashtag #BangforBond.

Elisabeth Moss: So good!

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Claes Bang : At the end of the festival, all these predictions come out, right? My agents were fanning me. “It says in Variety now that you’re gonna win. It says in the Daily Telegraph you’re gonna win. It says in The Guardian.” It said everywhere and I started fucking believing the hype. I did. I started believing the hype, because everybody was saying, “It’s an amazing film. It’s so fucking good, but you’re not gonna win the big thing because it’s too funny.” So when we got that phone call on Sunday…

The Playlist: And they told Ruben to come, too, it wasn’t just…

Claes Bang: No, no. They invite the entire crew that is there. So they said to come and I was like, “Fuck, I’m gonna get [an] award.” So when they said, “And the award for Best Actor goes to,” I was almost fucking getting my ass out of the seat and then they said, “Joaquin Phoenix.” I was like, “Okay, I’ll stay put.” Then the next prize went, the next prize went, the next prize went and there was just one left. I leaned over to Rupert and I said, “Unless they’re really fucking with us, we’re gonna get the big one.” We got the big one and I was like, really, really so fucking happy about it, and he was, and everything was exploding, and then five minutes later I was like, “Wait a fucking second. What the fuck was that? He stole my award,that fucking Swedish wanker.” (Laughs.) So what happened is that all the people that get the awards, they go off to a press conference.

Elisbeth Moss: Yeah.

The Playlist: Yeah, I was at the press conferences.

Claes Bang: There’s an amazing party that starts out on the top of the Palais overlooking this harbor with all the boats and everything. Then you go down to the beach where there’s a department of a French restaurant that’s just the most amazing food, champagne, people in tuxes. I mean, amazing. I started to get a little bit pissed. I got quite drunk and then Ruben came back from the press conference and I saw him over there, and I was like, “I’m fucking gonna hurt him now. I’m fucking gonna go over there and kick his ass.”

The Playlist: Really?

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Claes Bang: I was so mad. I was really … and I have done really, really stupid stuff when I’m drunk. So, I said to my wife, “We need to leave now.” So we left.

Elisabeth Moss: That’s the danger of believing the hype! That’s why after eight nominations I will never convince me of anything else other than that I’m gonna lose.

Claes Bang: And Ruben texted me something at [1 AM asking] “Where the fuck are you? I mean, we won and everybody’s asking for you.” I mean, everybody there had seen that film and unless you know Ruben, you don’t know that he is the guy, but everybody knew that I was sort of the lead of the film. And I was just…

Elisabeth Moss: Gone.

Claes Bang: I was gone.

The Playlist: But when you woke up the next morning with the hangover were you at least excited?

Claes Bang: I had to get up like, fuck dead early the next morning. That was one of the things. I had a show in Edinburgh that next night.

The Playlist: But when you were going to the airport, on the plane, you must have been thinking “Holy cow!” because when you make a movie you don’t necessarily think it’s going to win the Palme d’Or at Cannes.

Claes Bang: No, and my wife, she was so fucking mad with me. She said, “We’re leaving the party of our lives. There’s boom boom boom and they all want to talk to you, and now we’re leaving.” “Yes,” I said, “This is not where I’m gonna kill a director or try and break the Palme d’Or in half to say ‘This is mine’ or something.”

Elisabeth Moss: But how Ruben Ostlund would that have been if the lead actor and the director got into a fight?

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Claes Bang: Exactly.

The Playlist: Yes!

Claes Bang: When I told him this story, because I’ve told him and I’ve told the press and everything now, he was just like, “This is the best story of the whole shoot.”

Elisabeth Moss: Yeah, it’s the greatest!

The Playlist: He’s gonna put this in a movie now. You realize this, right?

Claes Bang: It’s cool. It’s fine. It’s no problem. Listen, what I actually find quite funny is that when you think about it, it’s like, “Oh my God, no. Did I do that?” But when I tell the story people are like, “Finally, someone is coming out and saying I was really, really disappointed not to win.”

Elisabeth Moss: Right. Totally, yes.

Claes Bang: It was literally something like five or six places where it said, “He’s gonna win it.” I fucking believed it.

Elisabeth Moss: Of course. It’s dangerous!

The Playlist: By the way, I’m one of those people that do the stuff that say “these people are going to win.”

Elisabeth Moss: Right, exactly!

The Playlist: So, I guess I apologize?

Elisabeth Moss: No, by all means. It’s your job, but it’s like…

Claes Bang: I have this thing also that was like, “Okay, they really invited a rookie to Cannes. Now we’re gonna fuck with him.”

The Playlist: It’s not personal!

Claes Bang: “We’re gonna build him up, we’re gonna make him believe, and then-”

Elisabeth Moss: “We’re gonna take it away. Just to teach him a lesson.”

The Playlist: Elisabeth, you weren’t at the ceremony. Were you there for the premiere and then you left?

Elisabeth Moss: I went to Antibes which is like 45 minutes, a half an hour away or something. Nobody asked me to go to the Palme d’Or Ceremony.

The Playlist: Oh, they didn’t call and tell you? I thought they gave everyone 24 hours notice.

Claes Bang: No. For instance, if you’re in Japan and you’ve gone back to Japan and you’re getting an award, they will let you know in time so you can get on a plane.

Disclaimer: Photographs utilized by this page is not the sole property of the page or it administrators; the photos utilized by us come from around the worldwide web and are shared publicly.

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CHRISTO TALKS: “IT’S NOT A PROFESSION, IT’S EXISTENCE”

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Christo, you and your wife Jeanne-Claude were born on the exact same day in 1935, but in completely different countries. Do you believe in destiny?

Jeanne-Claude always said, “There are a million people born on the same day.” But it happened that we met, that’s all. That is something not unusual. But there are many things that are not destiny. You make your own destiny.

You worked together for nearly 50 years. Would you have become the same artist without her?

It’s the same question to ask, “What would happen if I were Chinese?” (Laughs) We cannot discuss these things – if, if, if – there are no ifs. After living for 80 years, there are no ifs. I can only say one if and it was that I was rather lucky to escape in 1957 to the West. I had never been outside of Bulgaria until 1956 and if I didn’t go to the West, things would have probably been different.

The Soviets had a very strict policy against modern art so you might have not made art at all.

I was drawing all the time as a little boy, like 5 or 6 years old, and it was at this age that I decided to be an artist. There was never a thought about anything else. But it’s true, in the late ’40s and early ’50s most modern art was not permitted to be seen in the Soviet Bloc countries. There were some very bad reproductions and old books… I desperately tried to go beyond Bulgaria and the Soviet Bloc, but even going to other communist countries was very difficult. Fortunately my aunt and my uncle were living in Prague and finally I succeeded in finding a way to visit them. And I was totally flabbergasted by Prague!

Why?

It was the most Western country. Even before the chance to fully escape came into view, I had already decided that I was never going to go back to Bulgaria! I was going to stay in Prague. I was young, like 21 years old, and when you’re young and you discover the relatively small freedom of the Western art in Czechoslovakia and Prague in the late ’50s, suddenly you dream of going to Paris! And this is how the stage was set for me to go to Paris.

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THE ANA ROŠ TALK: “IT HAS TO DO WITH OUR OWN PERSONALITY”

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Ms. Roš, what are the main challenges in Slovenian cuisine today?

I think Slovenia is slowly, slowly stepping on the world gastronomic map. But my generation of chefs needs to fight for every single step, and every decision is opening a new door. If you work in Italy or Germany, and you cook well, sooner or later you will get the recognition that you need — there is the Michelin Guide, there is Gault Millau, there is the L’Espresso Guide. While in Slovenia, you can be really good, but up to the moment when the international community acknowledges you, you are actually no one.

You have been the head chef of Hiša Franko in Kobarid for almost 20 years — and it wasn’t until this year that you were recognized as the number one female chef by the World’s 50 Best Restaurants academy.

Right, it’s a very, very slow process. Everybody travels for food to Copenhagen, London, or Paris, but who knows where Kobarid is? So it has been a long, long struggle and fight. It doesn’t have only to do with the quality of the restaurant; you have to prove that you are worth certain awards three times more than in developed countries.

“Creativity is something that does not come only from our childhood — it has a lot to do with our own personality.”

I guess the former Yugoslavia doesn’t necessarily come to mind as a haven for creativity in fine dining. What was it like growing up there in the 1990s?

Well, my mother was actually a brilliant cook. She was a journalist and a very creative person, so our meals at home were very colorful and never repeated. But if I think of the food from my childhood, I think of a simple pasta dish with homemade tomato sauce. It really was a super flavorful meal, with a drop of olive oil on the top and with no cheese. That was the most loved meal when I was a child! That is what they call, “happy food.” You know, my children would kill for it.

My parents lived through the communist regime and told me they used to get so excited over simple things like bananas because they were so rare.

Yes but you know, Yugoslavia never had a very strict organization of the country — the borders were open and we could travel. Tito was a “bon vivant” and he was letting his people have a pretty free life. So Yugoslavia had a lot of good things as well. I think Yugoslavia was a place with a lot of creative people; culture was super strong, especially in Zagreb and Belgrade. But I think that creativity is something that either is in a person or is not. Let’s say I have two children and they are both raised in the same way. The girl is super creative and totally irrational, while the boy is totally rational and not creative at all. I think it is something that does not come only from our childhood or from our upbringing or from the regime in which we lived in — it has a lot to do with our own personality.

Do you feel more creative and irrational, or the other way around?

Oh, I’m too instinctive sometimes! You see, my problem — and sometimes it is also a good thing — is that I don’t question a lot. I actually just jump in the water and swim and I am a kind of personality that is never happy with average results. At Hiša Franko, I never questioned myself about how it is going to be like, especially because I never had any prior experience of seeing how a restaurant really works and I’m completely self-taught so it was like a total experiment and we are still making corrections.

Source: The Talk

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